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instagram/Vitoria Londero (NEW YORK) -- A banner that read "Refugees Welcome" was unfurled atop the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty on Tuesday.

According to U.S. Park Police, the banner, 20 feet by 3 feet, was illegally affixed to the wall of the public observation deck at the statue's base by nylon rope.

When rangers were alerted to the banner's presence, they immediately moved to its location and assessed how it was attached to the monument, police said. Rangers began removing the banner after it was determined it could be done without damaging the pedestal.

An investigation is underway to identify suspects.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump denounced anti-Semitism Tuesday after facing criticism that he has not come out strongly enough against recent threats directed at U.S. Jewish centers.

"The anti-Semitic threats targeting our Jewish community and community centers are horrible and are painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil," Trump remarked after touring the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

"This tour was a meaningful reminder of why we have to fight bigotry, intolerance and hatred in all of its very ugly forms," Trump said from a podium set up at the museum.

The executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect found fault with Trump's statement, arguing Trump's "too little, too late acknowledgement of anti-Semitism" is "not enough."

“The president’s sudden acknowledgement is a Band-Aid on the cancer of Antisemitism [sic] that has infected his own administration," Steven Goldstein said in a statement posted to Facebook.

Goldstein accused the Trump administration of committing "grotesque acts and omissions reflecting anti-Semitism."

"It was only yesterday, Presidents Day, that Jewish Community Centers across the nation received bomb threats, and the president said absolutely nothing," Goldstein argued.

The FBI announced it would investigate, along with the Justice Department, the bomb threats made at Jewish centers across the country.

In a press conference last week, Trump was asked by a Jewish reporter about the recent wave of threats.

"I haven’t seen anybody in my community accuse either yourself or -- anyone on your staff of being anti-Semitic. However, what we are concerned about, and what we haven’t really heard being addressed, is an uptick in anti-Semitism and how the government is planning to take care of it," Jake Turx of Ami Magazine began.

Trump cut Turx off and dismissed the question as unfair and "very insulting."

"Number one, I am the least anti-Semitic person that you've ever seen in your entire life. Number two, racism, the least racist person," Trump said, interpreting the question as a personal attack.

"I hate the charge. I find it repulsive. I hate even the question,” Trump said.

Trump was also criticized last month for a statement he released on Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“It is with a heavy heart and somber mind that we remember and honor the victims, survivors, heroes of the Holocaust,” Trump said in the statement. “In the name of the perished, I pledge to do everything in my power throughout my presidency, and my life, to ensure that the forces of evil never again defeat the powers of good.”

The statement received backlash for not mentioning Jews or anti-Semitism.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer defended the statement in a press briefing a few days later, saying it was "written with the help of an individual who is both Jewish and the descendants of Holocaust survivors."

“To suggest that remembering the Holocaust and acknowledging all of the people -- Jewish, gypsies, priests, disabled, gays and lesbians -- it is pathetic that people are picking on a statement," Spicer said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed higher after the holiday weekend as the major indexes notched new records.

The Dow jumped 118.95 ( 0.58 percent) to finish at 20,743.00.

The Nasdaq gained 27.37 ( 0.47 percent) to close at 5,865.95, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,365.38, up 14.22 ( 0.60 percent) from its open.

Crude oil prices were 1 percent higher; about $54 a barrel.

Winners and Losers:  Shares in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc soared 3 percent after its fourth-quarter earnings beat analysts' expectations.

The weekend announcement that Kraft-Heinz Co. pulled its $143 billion merger offer for Unilever caused shares in both food companies to sink about 2 percent and 8 percent respectively.

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Joe Faraoni / ESPN Images(BOSTON) -- Tom Brady's Super Bowl jersey, which went missing from his locker after the New England Patriots' Super Bowl 51 victory, has an estimated value of $500,000, according to a complaint filed with the Houston Police Department.

Police have classified the case as a possible first-degree felony.

"On 2/05/17, the City of Houston hosted Super Bowl LI in the NRG Stadium. Shortly after winning the game, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady noticed his game jersey missing from his locker in the Patriots designated locker room," according to the police report detailing the Feb. 5 incident at NRG Stadium.

News of the missing jersey first surfaced when Brady told team owner Robert Kraft in an on-camera locker room conversation after the game that he was unable to locate the jersey he wore as he led the team to the 34-28 overtime win on Feb. 5

"Someone stole my game jersey," Brady said after kissing Kraft on the cheek.

"You better look online," Kraft responded. The NFL, which captured the exchange, shared it on Twitter, posting the video with the caption: "Hey can someone give Tom Brady his jersey back? #SB51."

Brady, listed as the complainant in the Feb. 6 police report, told reporters the day after the game that, "I put it in the bag, and then I came out and it wasn't there anymore. So it's unfortunate because that's a nice piece of memorabilia. "So if it shows up on eBay somewhere, someone let me know."

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ABC News(MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C.) -- A security camera recently captured the hair-raising moment a coyote stealthily followed a doctor into his office in South Carolina.

The doctor -- Steven Poletti, an orthopedic surgeon -- said the harrowing incident happened early in the morning on Feb. 15 while he was walking into work at the Southeastern Spine Institute in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

Poletti had no idea a coyote was behind him until they were both inside the building, he told ABC News Tuesday.

"I felt something brush my leg and then turned around," he said. "At first glance, I thought it was a dog."

But Poletti quickly realized the animal was a coyote when he caught sight of its "bared teeth and big, bushy tail with a black tip."

"We were enclosed in this small 10-by-10-foot stairwell area, and I didn't want it to run into the operating room or into the office," Poletti said. "I just shook my keys out of fear, and the coyote took a step back and looked like he was frightened. Then, I just made a run for it."

The coyote chased the doctor outside for about 10 feet until a squirrel distracted it and it ran off, Poletti said.

"It all happened very quickly," he said. "I was just shocked because the office isn't in a rural or forest area, and there are a lot of homes and commercial properties nearby."

Poletti noted, though, that coyotes are abundant on Sullivan Island in South Carolina -- the beach island town where he lives and which is about three miles from his office.

"We hear them howling on a nightly basis," he said. "There are definitely a lot of coyote reports in the surrounding areas, but I don't think we've ever had a coyote enter a building like this before."

Poletti said he called the Mount Pleasant Police Department and reported the incident.

The doctor said that initially, animal control officers from the police department told him he could hire a private trapper. However, a few days later, the police department offered to have its animal control officers set up a trap to try and capture the coyote, Poletti said.

The Mount Pleasant Police Department did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment on the incident.

Mount Pleasant Mayor Linda Page confirmed that the town generally refers residents to trappers when they report coyote sightings, according to local newspaper The Post and Courier.

Page declined to provide further comment on the town's response to the incident until she could talk with her staff about it, the newspaper reported.

She did say, however, that if "there's any kind of danger to human life, we're going to take it seriously," The Post and Courier added.

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David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images for Netflix(PARIS) -- George Clooney is opening up about becoming a first-time dad.

Speaking to the French publication Paris Match, the 55-year-old actor says expecting twins with wife Amal Clooney is both exciting and nerve-wracking.

“How could I not be anxious when facing this huge responsibility? Having a baby… And actually two!” he says. “We are very happy, very excited, but also a bit nervous. It’s normal.”

He also comments on reports about the gender of the twins, saying they’re actually keeping that a surprise.

“There are rumors that we are going to have a boy and a girl; I don’t know where this is coming from,” he says. “We don’t know yet and we don’t want to know.”

Clooney also appeared on the French TV program Recontres de Cinema, where he called impending fatherhood “an adventure” that he’s embracing “with arms wide open.”

He says after he informed his friends -- who all have grown children -- that Amal was expecting twins, they teased him a bit.

“[It] got really quiet, and they all just started making baby crying noises,” he says. “And the whole table just busted up laughing.”

George is receiving an honorary award at the Cesar Awards, France’s equivalent of the Oscars, on February 24.

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Courtesy SD Biju(NEW YORK) -- Scientists from India have discovered seven new species of frogs, according to a news release Tuesday from PeerJ, a peer-reviewed biological and medical sciences journal.

All of the newly discovered frogs all belong to the genus Nyctibatrachus, scientists said. Frogs of this genus are commonly known as night frogs because of their dark colors and habitats.

The amphibians were found over the course of five years by University of Delhi scientists who went on extensive expeditions through India's Western Ghats region, an amphibian and global biodiversity hot spot.

Four of the seven new frog species are considered miniature frogs, and they are among the smallest known frogs in the world.

The tiny frogs are as small as 12 mm (less than half an inch), and they grow no bigger than 16 mm, according to researchers. They can sit comfortably on a coin or a fingernail.

Scientists said they were surprised that the miniature species of frogs were locally abundant and fairly common, according to Sonali Garg, a University of Delhi student who participated in the expeditions as part of her Ph.D. research.

The tiny frogs species were likely overlooked by researchers "because of their extremely small size, secretive habitats and insect-like calls," Garg said.

Unfortunately, the futures of many of the newly discovered frog species may be bleak, according to scientists.

Many of the frogs live outside protected areas and on human-altered properties, researchers said. Those frogs face threats such as habitat disturbance, modification and fragmentation.

"Over 32 percent -- that is one-third of the Western Ghats frogs -- are already threatened with extinction," said SD Biju, a University of Delhi professor who led the study.

Biju has formally described more than 80 new species of amphibians from India over the course of his career.

"Out of the seven new species, five are facing considerable anthropogenic threats and require immediate conservation prioritization", Biju said.

More details about the frogs can be found in the study published Tuesday in PeerJ.

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