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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- There's no honeymoon for Donald Trump in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll, but also no regrets: He approaches his 100th day in office with the lowest approval rating at this point of any president in polls since 1945 –- yet 96 percent of those who supported him in November say they'd do it again today.

His challenges are considerable. Majorities say Trump lacks the judgment and the temperament it takes to serve effectively. Six in 10 doubt his honesty and trustworthiness, see him as out of touch and don't think he understands the problems of people like them. Fifty-six percent say he hasn't accomplished much in his first 100 days. And 55 percent say he doesn't follow a consistent set of principles in setting policy (though fewer see this as a problem, 48 percent).

All told, 42 percent of Americans approve of Trump's performance as president, while 53 percent disapprove. That compares to an average of 69-19 percent for past presidents at or near 100 days in office -– for example, 69-26 percent for Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama.

Still, the national survey also finds some brighter spots for the president –- chiefly in pushing for jobs and in foreign policy –- as well as deep popularity problems for the opposition party. Sixty-seven percent say the Democratic Party is out of touch with the concerns of most Americans, even more than say the same about Trump, and similar to the Republican Party (62 percent). That's a steeply negative turn for the Democrats, 19 percentage points more critical than when last asked three years ago, including especially steep losses in their own base.

Trump's better grades include broad 73 percent approval of his pressuring companies to keep jobs in the United States –- even most Democrats, liberals and nonwhites approve, three groups that are broadly critical of Trump more generally. And more than half, 53 percent, see him as a strong leader, although that compares with 77 percent for Obama at this stage.

On one specific issue, a plurality, 46 percent, says he's handling the situation with North Korea "about right," as opposed to being too aggressive (37 percent) or too cautious (just 7 percent). Similarly, a recent ABC/Post poll found 51 percent support for Trump's missile strikes on Syria; together these results make his foreign policy a comparative bright spot. They're also a contrast with Obama, seen by 53 percent as too cautious in his foreign policy in fall 2014, as he dealt with Syria and Russian intervention in Ukraine.

As noted, this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds no evidence of buyer's remorse among Trump supporters. Among those who report having voted for him in November, 96 percent today say it was the right thing to do; a mere 2 percent regret it. And if a rerun of the election were held today, the poll indicates even the possibility of a Trump victory in the popular vote among 2016 voters.

In two break-even results, Americans divide, 44-41 percent, on whether Trump is keeping most of his campaign promises, and likewise divide, 35-35 percent, on whether he's doing a better or worse job than they expected. Views turn negative, as noted, on how much Trump has accomplished in his first three months. Forty-two percent say a great deal or good amount, but 56 percent say not much or nothing.

Again, Obama scored far better on all three of these measures at his 100th day, 60-26 percent on keeping his promises, 54-18 percent on performing better vs. worse than expected and 63-36 percent on his accomplishments.

There are difficulties for Trump in other results, as well. Just 37 percent approve of the major changes in federal spending he's proposed (50 percent disapprove) and only 34 percent approve of his having given his daughter and son-in-law, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, major positions in his administration (61 percent disapprove). (There are only three groups in which more than half approve of these appointments –- Republicans, 69 percent; evangelical white Protestants, 56 percent; and conservatives, 51 percent.) And rejecting Trump's criticisms, the public by 58-36 percent says the federal courts that have blocked his immigration orders are "acting rightly as a check on the president's powers" rather than wrongly interfering with them.

The president does better on another item on which he's been criticized in some quarters –- spending substantial time at commercial properties he owns, chiefly his Mar-a-Lago resort. Forty-three percent see this as a conflict of interest because it promotes those properties, but 54 percent say it's not a conflict because he has the right to go where he wants.

The 100-day point has been used as a benchmark since Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration, but, like any such time stamp, it has questionable predictive value. As noted, it usually marks the height of a president's honeymoon in public opinion. It's also situational. In available data, the highest rating at or near 100 days was Harry Truman's 87 percent in a Gallup poll when he took office after the Roosevelt's death; yet Truman's career average was 47 percent approval. The lowest at 100 days was Gerald Ford's 48 percent after he succeeded (and pardoned) Richard Nixon, yet Ford's career average was about the same as Truman's. Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush had 63 and 71 percent 100-day approval ratings –- yet neither won a second term.

Current politics, moreover, are marked by especially sharp partisanship, a central reason for Trump's comparatively poor rating. Seventy-nine percent of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents approve of his job performance; just 12 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents agree. Obama at 100 days did better in his base, with 93 percent approval from leaned Democrats, but also had 40 percent from leaned Republicans.

As mentioned, Trump's challenges don't mean the opposition is in good shape. In March 2014, 48 percent of Americans said the Democratic Party was out of touch with the concerns of most people. Today 67 percent say so. And the biggest change has occurred chiefly among the party's own typical loyalists, with "out of touch" ratings up 33 points among liberals, 30 points among Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 26 points among moderates and nonwhites alike.

Vote again?

Among Americans who say they voted in the 2016 election, 46 percent say they voted for Hillary Clinton and 43 percent for Trump, very close to the 2-point margin in the actual popular vote results. However, while Trump would retain almost all of his support if the election were held again today (96 percent), fewer of Clinton's supporters say they’d stick with her (85 percent), producing a 40-43 percent Clinton-Trump result in this hypothetical re-do among self-reported 2016 voters.

That's not because former Clinton supporters would now back Trump; only 2 percent of them say they'd do so, similar to the 1 percent of Trump voters who say they'd switch to Clinton. Instead, they're more apt to say they'd vote for a third-party candidate or wouldn’t vote.

In a cautionary note to her party, Clinton's 6-point drop in a hypothetical mulligan election relates to views of whether the Democratic Party is in touch with peoples' concerns. Although the sample sizes are small, those who say the party is out of touch are less likely to say they'd support Clinton again, compared with those who see it as in touch.

Still, there's no strong evidence that defectors primarily come from groups that favored Bernie Sanders in the primary. There are no broad differences by age, and liberals are 9 points more likely than moderates and conservatives to stick with Clinton. Similarly, nonwhites are 10 points more likely than whites to say they would not support Clinton again, with more than a third of them heading to the Libertarian candidate, Gary Johnson.

Approval groups

Trump's approval rating among groups differs in familiar patterns from the election. Fifty-four percent of whites approve of his job performance; just 19 percent of nonwhites (including 22 percent of Hispanics and 6 percent of blacks) agree. His approval rating is 15 points lower among the youngest adults compared with seniors. It's 67 percent among conservatives vs. 37 percent among moderates and 9 percent among liberals. And it's 73 percent among evangelical white Protestants, a GOP mainstay.

Trump's rating is 10 points higher among whites who lack a college degree than among those who have one. Indeed, again echoing the election, he reaches 65 percent approval among non-college white men, vs. 40 percent among college-educated white women.

The economys another factor; while it doesn’t guarantee presidential approval, a strong or improving economy at least makes it easier to achieve. Today 30 percent say the economy is improving, vs. 18 percent who say it’s getting worse, with a plurality, 49 percent, saying it’s staying the same. Among those who think it’s improving, 83 percent approve of Trump’s job performance, while among those who think it’s staying the same, just 29 percent approve, as do only 10 percent of those who say it’s getting worse.

Of course, the result likely is bi-directional – views of the economy color views of the president, but views of the president also influence views of the economy. Indeed, 62 percent of Republicans think the economy’s improving; just a quarter of independents and 12 percent of Democrats agree.

 There are notable differences among groups on other questions as well. One is a large age effect on whether or not Trump is in touch with people’s concerns – 71 percent of under 30s say not, as do 65 percent of those age 30 to 39, declining to 52 percent – still a majority – among those 40 .

Additionally, 62 percent of Democrats say Trump is not keeping his promises, while 77 percent of Republicans say he is keeping them. (Independents split evenly.) As with views of the future economy, that’s an example of motivated reasoning – sharply different assessments of the same object, informed by partisan predispositions. Whatever changes in the Trump administration, this phenomenon – typical of all politics – likely won’t.

Methodology

This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cellular telephone April 17-20, 2017, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,004 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points, including the design effect. Partisan divisions are 31-24-36 percent, Democrats-Republicans-independents.

The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y., with sampling, data collection and tabulation by Abt Associates of Cambridge, Massachusetts. See details on the survey’s methodology here.

See the full results here.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- Far-right populist Marine Le Pen and centrist Emmanuel Macron claimed victory in Sunday's first-round vote in the French presidential election.

Besting nine other candidates, the two will now face off in a second and final round on May 7.

Celebrating his advancement, Macron addressed supporters in Paris, in a speech that called for unity and reiterated his support for the European Union.

"The deep seated feeling, age old feeling that has always pushed our people forward, the commitment to our country, the collective interest over division, this is what has won tonight," he said as a sea of supporters waved French flags. "This election has opened the door to optimism, to a new path to hope for Europe for the world."

With his words, he drew a sharp contrast with his opponent, who has floated the idea of referendum -- dubbed "Frexit" -- on whether to leave or remain in the E.U.

Favored to win the second-round, Macron -- a 39-year-old former government minister who has never held elected office -- was quick to cast himself as a political outsider, saying, "I have heard your expectations, for true change, for true democracy," and urged his voters to "start writing a whole new page in the political history of our country."

Le Pen, who appears to have come in second place, according to exit polls, said that the victory was an "honor" that she received "with humility and gratitude."

"From now on I have an immense responsibility of defending the French nation, its unity, its culture and its independence," she said. "The French must take advantage of this historical opportunity offered to them, because what is at stake here is the wild type of globalization endangering our civilization."

"The survival of France," was at stake in the second-round vote, she said.

She took shots at the European Union and sitting President François Hollande during her speech, before concluding and leading her supporters in singing the French national anthem.

Reports suggested that protesters in Paris have clashed with police in demonstrations against Le Pen's victory.

Sunday's result marked the first time that no major-party candidate would contest the second-round vote.

"This is still an anti-establishment outcome, even though Macron represents a centrist platform," Erik Brattberg, director of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Europe Program, told ABC News. "Worth watching now is whether other French politicians will be rallying around Macron to defeat Le Pen in second round."

François Fillon, the conservative candidate who appears to have come in third place, conceded defeat, saying: "There is no other choice than to vote against the extreme right. Therefore I am voting for Emmanuel Macron."

French voters were going to the polls for a first-round vote to choose their next president from among 11 candidates, including Le Pen, who opposes immigration and has voiced skepticism about France's membership in the European Union.

Pre-election polls suggested Le Pen and Macron, an independent centrist and former economy minister, were in the lead.

"Le Pen did as expected. There was no hidden Le Pen vote in the first round. While she can get more votes in a second round with only one opponent, she has likely reached a ceiling among her core voters," Brattberg predicted.

Leading up to the vote, Fillon, a former prime minister embroiled in a scandal over alleged fake jobs given to his wife and children, appeared to be closing the gap in recent days, as was far-left candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon.

"A last-minute push by Fillon and far-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon was not enough to get them into the run-off," Philip Crowther, a correspondent for France 24 in Washington, told ABC News. "This result is a disaster for France's main two parties -- the conservative Republican party and the Socialist party."

The election is seen as a litmus test for the future of the European Union and the spread of populism around the world.

More than 50,000 police and gendarmes were deployed to protect 66,000 polling stations for the election, which comes just three days after a deadly attack on Paris's famed Avenue des Champs-Elysees in which a police officer and a gunman were slain.

The presidential poll has consequences for the future of the European Union, for France's millions of Muslims and for world financial markets. It's also the first ever to be held while France is under a state of emergency, put in place since the November 2015 attacks in Paris that left 130 people dead.

President Trump said this week that he believed Le Pen was "the strongest on what's been going on in France," while former President Barack Obama called to wish Macron well in the poll.

Neither Trump nor Obama said he was making a formal endorsement.

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The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- The father of the Tennessee teen found more than a month after she was allegedly kidnapped by a former teacher said the girl's family wants her to be the same person she was before she disappeared.

But Anthony Thomas told ABC News that his 15-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, has now had experiences that may have changed her.

“What we want to see when we look at her is the child we knew,” Thomas told ABC News. “She may not be exactly ... the person she was because there’s a lot of experiences she’s had."

After Elizabeth was found, authorities described her as "healthy and unharmed," but added that the main concern is the state of her emotional and mental well-being.

Her father said that even physically, she has at least temporarily changed.

“She has lost a lot of weight,” Anthony Thomas said.

Elizabeth was allegedly kidnapped by her former teacher, Tad Cummins, 50, on March 13 and taken on the run. She and Cummins were found at a remote cabin in northern California near the Oregon border where he was captured Thursday.

Cummins, who surrendered to police without incident, faces charges of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor, authorities said.

The teen returned to Tennessee on Friday and is currently in a "safe location with family and friends where she is comfortable and resting," said Jason Whatley, who is representing the Thomas family.

Elizabeth’s father told ABC News that the family to "just keep things positive" in their interactions with her at this stage.

"I go in there and tell her how much I missed her, how much I love her and how much her dog missed her," Anthony Thomas said.

"I'm not allowed to ask her about things that happened along the way right now," he said.

He said that one of the first things Elizabeth asked for "was to see her baby sister."

That hasn't happened yet, the father said. "Now is not really the time."

Thomas recounted his daughter's take-charge personality. "She used to really believe in herself. She had this confidence," he said. "She was always a leader. She was very outspoken."

"I think she has the determination to really go somewhere in life," he said. "But right now she really needs a lot of help."

Thomas said the first material things Elizabeth asked for upon returning to Tennessee were a shower and a razor.

He added that she has few clothes in her possession right now. "All of the clothes she had with her were taken for evidence" after she and Cummins were found, he said. And many of the clothes she had left at home were previously taken by law enforcement to help with the investigation, he said.

Thomas said the loss of her clothes may be difficult for his teen daughter. "She was always particular with the way she dressed."

Elizabeth also asked to see her father upon her return to Tennessee, he said. "It was really great to have her tell her she loved me," he said.

He said his daughter had told authorities that she was afraid her father would be mad at her. "I think Tad had told her too, 'There’s no way you can go home because your dad is just going to be mad at you,'" Thomas said.

The father said he believes Cummins was aware of the search for him and his daughter, but he's not sure if his daughter knew before she was found the extent of the effort to find them. "Tad was apparently aware of all the flyers and all the things he saw," the father said. "I’m not sure of the extent he let her be exposed to that."

Thomas reflected on the difficulty of parenting a teenager, and then having that child disappear.

"At the end of the day when they’re gone, you find out you can’t live without them," he said.

Cummins is expected to make his first court appearance at 2 p.m. Monday in federal court in Sacramento.

In addition to facing charges of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor, he also faces a federal charge of transportation of a minor across state lines with the intent of having criminal sexual intercourse, which has been filed by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Tennessee, authorities said. That charge carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's been less than two weeks since a video of a bloodied passenger being dragged off a United Airlines aircraft ignited a national discussion about the airline industry’s treatment of passengers, and now, yet another onboard incident captured on video is raising eyebrows -- and it's resulted in the immediate grounding of a flight attendant.

A video posted to Facebook Friday by Surain Adyanthaya -- a passenger onboard American Airlines flight 591, from San Franciso to Dallas -- shows an intense confrontation between flight crew and a handful of passengers at the front of the aircraft while it is still on the tarmac in San Francisco.

The heated moment began when a flight attendant took away a stroller from a female passenger, Adyanthaya told ABC affiliate WFAA in Dallas, which reported that the woman was from Argentina and travelling with her two children.

 The nearly three-minute video does not show the flight attendant taking the stroller, but near its start, the woman is seen crying and asking for the stroller back.

The incident then escalates with a male passenger coming to her defense, and asking for the male flight attendant's name, saying, "Hey bud, hey bud, you do that to me and I'll knock you flat!"

The flight attendant, who is visibly angry, points his finger at the passenger and says, "Hey, you stay out of this!"

A pilot appears to attempt to calm down the flight attendant.

During the entire video, the female passenger continues to be heard crying.

 American Airlines was quick to react -- 20 minutes after the plane landed in Dallas. It apologized for the incident and said the flight attendant had been grounded. The woman and her family were also upgraded to first class.

"We have seen the video and have already started an investigation to obtain the facts," the Dallas-based airline said in a statement. "What we see on this video does not reflect our values or how we care for our customers. We are deeply sorry for the pain we have caused this passenger and her family and to any other customers affected by the incident. We are making sure all of her family's needs are being met while she is in our care. After electing to take another flight, we are taking special care of her and her family and upgrading them to first class for the remainder of their international trip."

The statement continues, "The actions of our team member captured here do not appear to reflect patience or empathy, two values necessary for customer care. In short, we are disappointed by these actions. The American team member has been removed from duty while we immediately investigate this incident."


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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The New York Rangers and Edmonton Oilers won their series-clinching games on Saturday night to advance to the second round of the NHL Stanley Cup playoffs.

The Rangers defeated the Montreal Canadiens 3-1 at home and the Oiles ousted the Sharks with a 3-1 victory in San Jose.

After trailing Montreal 2-1 in the series, New York ripped off three straight wins with a spread out offense: eighteen players scored at least one point in the series.

Now, the Rangers will play in the second round for the fifth time in six years, facing the winner of the Ottawa-Boston series.

As for the Oilers, it wasn't all about Conor McDavid. Goalie Cam Talbot had a strong series, posting two shutouts and allowing just a single goal in the deciding game.

The Oilers, who are in the playoffs for the first time since 2006, will face a team that's reached the postseason in five straight years: the Anaheim Ducks.

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images for EGPAF(LOS ANGELES) -- Richard Simmons is back home recovering after three days at Cedars Sinai Medical Center battling severe indigestion.

Simmons took to social media thanking hospital staff and law enforcement, writing “They make you feel good even though you’re in the hospital for feeling bad.”

He offered further praise of his medical caregivers, emergency responders and the U.S. military, saying, “They were so helpful and kind as I returned home. Let’s take a minute and all be thankful for medical professionals, police, firefighters and our brave military forces here and around the world. They risk so much every day to make us well and keep us protected. God Bless all of them.”

Michael Catalano, Simmons' longtime manager, confirmed to ABC News that Simmons returned home sooner than expected Thursday afternoon. “Richard is happy to be back home and thankful to everyone who has reached out. Richard is in good spirits.”

Last week, Catalano released a statement to ABC News saying, "After a few days of battling severe indigestion and discomfort while eating, we agreed it was best for him to seek treatment.”

Simmons, 68, who over the past few years has vanished from the public eye, signed a business deal for "merchandising, endorsements and licensing opportunities," Catalano announced earlier this month.

Catalano told ABC News on April 6 that Simmons pursued the deal.

The new venture comes on the heels of questions in recent years about Simmons' health, as were put forward in a viral podcast on the fitness icon's disappearance from public view, titled "Missing Richard Simmons."

Catalano commented on his client's relatively low profile, telling ABC News that Simmons just wants a break from fame. Catalano's comments echoed what Simmons told "Entertainment Tonight" last year.

"No one should be worried about me," Simmons said. "It was time for me to take some time to be by myself."

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ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images(HARRISON COUNTY, Ind.) -- Erin Moran, best known for playing Joanie Cunningham on the hit sitcom Happy Days and its spinoff, Joanie Loves Chachi, has died. She was 56.

The Harrison County Sheriffs Department in Harrison County, Indiana confirmed to ABC News that on Saturday, it received a 911 call about an unresponsive female.  When the responders arrived, they determined that the woman, identified as Erin Marie Moran Fleischmann, was deceased.  An autopsy is pending.

Moran, who had appeared in movies and on TV shows like The Courtship of Eddies' Father and My Three Sons, was cast as Joanie Cunningham, the younger sister of Ron Howard's Richie Cunningham, in 1974.  She played the role on Happy Days until 1982, when she and Scott Baio's character, Chachi Arcola, left to star in the spinoff Joanie Loves Chachi.  That show was canceled in 1983, and Moran returned to Happy Days for its final season.

After Happy Days, Moran made guest appearances in shows like The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote and Diagnosis: Murder.   In 2007, she appeared on the reality show Scott Baio Is 45 and Single as herself, and in 2008, she was a contestant on VH1's Celebrity Fit Club.

In recent years, Moran had reportedly fallen on hard times, and was said to be living in a trailer park, and then in a series of motels.

Her Happy Days co-star Henry Winkler, who played The Fonz, tweeted, "OH Erin... now you will finally have the peace you wanted so badly here on earth ...Rest In It serenely now.. too soon." 

Ron Howard tweeted, "Such sad sad news. RIP Erin. I'll always choose to remember you on our show making scenes better, getting laughs and lighting up tv screens."

Don Most, who played Richie's pal Ralph Malph on the show, tweeted, "So incredibly sad to hear about Erin. A wonderful, sweet, caring, talented woman.I can't really comprehend this right now.Very painful loss."

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Anson Williams, who played Richie's pal Potsie on the show, said in a statement, "Erin was a person who made everyone around her feel better. She truly cared about others first, a true angel. I will miss her so much, but know that she is in God’s hands. RIP sweet angel.”

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