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Uber(NEW YORK) -- A former employee is suing Uber less than a week after the company announced it is doing away with a rule that forced arbitration on passengers, drivers or employees who come forward with claims of sexual harassment or assault.

The lawsuit, filed by software engineer Ingrid Avendaño, alleges years of discrimination based on her gender and race, sexual harassment and a hostile work environment, retaliation for taking a medical leave and pay inequality, among other allegations. The suit will be the first test of the company’s new policy.

According to the lawsuit, Avendaño, who worked for the company from February 2014 to June 2017, "was repeatedly faced with discriminatory treatment and sexually explicitly conduct specifically directed at female employees."

"Each time Avendaño raised concerns regarding unlawful conduct, she was met with Uber's entrenched disregard for the rights of its women employees and a refusal to take effective steps to prevent harassment," the lawsuit said. "Worse, she suffered blatant retaliation, including denial of promotions and raises, unwarranted negative performance reviews, and placement on an oppressively demanding on-call schedule that had detrimental effects on her health."

"Uber's failure to take effective remedial measures for her to resign," the suit added.

An Uber spokesperson responded to the lawsuit in a statement to ABC News: “Uber is moving in a new direction. Last week, we proactively announced changes to our arbitration policies. And in the past year we have implemented a new salary and equity structure based on the market, overhauled our performance review process, published Diversity & Inclusion reports, and created and delivered diversity and leadership trainings to thousands of employees globally.”

Uber’s chief legal officer, Tony West, detailed the “changes” to the “arbitration policy” in a letter that was published on the company’s website on May 15, 2018.

West wrote that the company "will no longer require mandatory arbitration for individual claims of sexual assault or sexual harassment by Uber riders, drivers or employees."

This update, he continued, will "give riders, drivers and employees options to continue taking accusations of harassment or assaults into arbitration, but also allow for a confidential forum such as mediation or let the case play out in open court."

Avendaño was also a part of lawsuit filed against Uber in October of 2017. In the suit, she and two other female employees alleged that Uber violated the Equal Pay Act and the Private Attorney General Act.

The suit, which sought class-action status, said the company's policies, patterns and practices allowed "female engineers and engineers of color [to] receive less compensation and [be] promoted less frequently than their male and/or white or Asian American counterparts.”

Uber agreed in March to a $10 million settlement to be distributed among hundreds of victims but Avendaño, who removed herself from the complaint, opted out the settlement to pursue her own individual claims, her lawyer Jennifer Schwartz, a partner at Outten & Golden LLP, told ABC News.

Uber has denied all wrongdoing and agreed to implement a number of different business practices, including diversity and inclusion training, as part of the settlement, which is awaiting final court approval.

Schwartz said Avendaño chose to pursue individual action because “the magnitude and scope of her claims were greater and different than those claims in the class action lawsuit.”

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ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump continued to fuel GOP accusations that an informant was embedded in his presidential campaign for political purposes, saying Tuesday that “a lot of people are saying” there were spies.

“A lot of people are saying they had spies in my campaign,” President Trump said during his wide-ranging comments in the Oval Office during a press spray of a meeting with South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in.

“If they had spies in my campaign, that would be a disgrace to this country,” Trump continued. “It would be very illegal aside from everything else. It would make probably every political event ever look like small potatoes so we want to make sure there weren't. I hope there weren't frankly.”

“If they had spies in my campaign, during my campaign for political purposes, that would be unprecedented in the history of our country,” he later added.

The president has seized on reports from the New York Times and Washington Post that the FBI sent an informant to meet with members of his campaign. The Times cited unnamed sources that these contacts were made only after the FBI had gathered information that the source’s targets had made suspicious contacts with Russians during the campaign.

The FBI has not confirmed that it used an informant and so far there is no evidence that was one embedded in the Trump campaign.

The president rebuffed ABC News' question about whether he continues to have confidence in Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who on Sunday said the DOJ would look into whether there was any improper activities related to the Trump campaign after the president ordered DOJ probe the issue.

“What is your next question, please,” Trump said, passing over the question. “I have the president of South Korea here. He doesn't want to hear these questions, if you don't mind.”

On Sunday, Trump took to Twitter to issue a "demand" that the DOJ "look into" whether there was any improper surveillance of his campaign "for political purposes."

Later Sunday, Rosenstein issued a statement saying, “If anyone did infiltrate or surveil participants in a presidential campaign for inappropriate purposes, we need to know about it and take appropriate action."

Following the weekend tweet, President Trump met on Monday with Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray. Despite the timing of the meeting the day after his tweet demand, the president said Tuesday that the meeting was “very routine."

Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer is among critics who have called it highly inappropriate.

Speaking of the alleged informant, the president said he’s read in news reports that “some person got paid a lot of money” and “that is not a normal situation, the kind of money you are talking about.”

“I think the Department of Justice wants to get down to it and Congress does so hopefully they will all be able to get together,” Trump said. “General Kelly will be setting up a meeting between Congress and the various representatives and they will be able to open up documents, take a look and find out what happened.”

Democrats have raised objections to that meeting as well – demanding to be included and questioning whether Trump and Kelly would be allowed to review classified information about the Mueller investigation that include the identify of any informant.

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Google Maps(SYRACUSE, N.Y.) -- A New York judge on Tuesday ordered a 30-year-old man to vacate his parents’ home after they took him to court when he refused to leave.

"I want you out of that household," New York State Supreme Court Judge Donald Greenwood told Michael Rotondo, pointing at him with his right index finger, according to ABC Syracuse affiliate WSYR-TV.

Rotondo was displeased, the station reported.

"That's outrageous," he said. He later confirmed that he plans to appeal the decision.

The judge explained that Rotondo was given numerous notices, but Rotondo tried to argue as his own attorney that he needed more time, according to WSYR-TV.

"I don't see why we can't just wait a little bit for me to leave the house," he said to the judge.

After the judge ruled in Rotondo's parents' favor, he approached the judge's bench to ask for one last consideration.

But Greenwood told him, "Sir, I've already ruled."

Rotondo told WSYR-TV after Greenwood's ruling that he plans to get some things from the Camillus, New York, home, adding that he wasn’t sure where he would stay now.

The judge also asked the state's protective services to check on the well-being of Michael Rotondo's parents, Christina and Mark Rotondo, according to WSYR-TV.

Their son moved back into the home eight years ago after losing a job, he told WSYR-TV, adding that he and his parents aren't on speaking terms. He said he now runs a “website business.”

The parents declined to comment after the judge’s ruling. Attempts to reach the parents and their attorney were unsuccessful.

They took their son to court after several failed attempts to get him out, including a cash offer of $1,100 to move his belongings and get his Volkswagen Passat off their driveway, court documents obtained by ABC News show.

Outside court, Michael Rotondo said he took the money, but didn't go on a search for a place to live, WSYR-TV reported.

"I spent it on expenses," he said.

The parents penned several letters to him going back to February, all asking him to leave the home they say they’ve owned since 1975, according to a civil petition they filed in Odondaga County Court. But Michael Rotondo wouldn't budge.

In court, Michael Rotondo asked the judge for six months, then, after the judge disagreed with his interpretation of the case, he said he could leave sooner.

"I don't presently expect to be there three months from now," he told the judge.

Michael Rotondo said that he's "not a burden to them in the home" and the parents "don't provide laundry or food."

But the judge didn't appear convinced, at one point bringing Michael Rotondo and the parents' attorney to his bench to consider mediation.

The parent's attorney told the judge that neither Mark nor Christina Rotondo have any "obligation to provide support" to their 30-year-old son and that they are considering becoming "empty nesters" and want the option "to sell their large house and move to smaller quarters that suits their needs."

The letters included in the petition illustrate their rising frustration.

Michael Rotondo attempted to answer the claims and stated in a motion to dismiss that "he is a family member, who cannot be evicted" and cited 2006 legal case cited the 2006 case of Kosa v. Legg, placing the blame on his parents for violating law by forcing him out of their home without enough notice.

Michael Rotondo claims he hasn't "made life difficult" for his parents and that there was never any expectation on him to "contribute to household expenses" or do chores or maintain the home, the motion states.

The parents' letters to him paint a different picture.

On Feb. 2, his parents wrote him four sentences demanding "that you must leave this house immediately" and giving him two weeks "to vacate."

"You will not be allowed to return," the letter reads. "We will take whatever actions are necessary to enforce this action."

On Feb, 13, three days shy of the 14 days they promised, the parents wrote Michael Rotondo informing him that they retained an attorney.

They gave their son 30 days "to vacate the premises" and threatened a "legal procedure," if he didn't abide by the letter, the petition reads. They also warn him to refrain from "threatening or harassing action" that he might consider taking.

Then they offer Michael Rotondo the cash.

"Here is $1,100 from us to you so you can find a place to stay," they wrote in a Feb. 18 letter, included in the petition.

It came with "advice" that he start organizing his belongings and hawk the rest.

"Sell other things you have that have any significant value, (eg. stereo, some tools etc.)," the letter in the petition reads.

This applied to weapons too.

"This is especially true for any weapons you may have," the letter adds. "You need the money and will have no place for the stuff."

The letter also advises Michael Rotondo not only move out but get a job.

"There are jobs available even for those with a poor work history like you," they write in the letter. "Get one -- you have to work!"

More letters in the petition were sent in March. Each demands Michael leave and get his car fixed and off the parents' property.

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Airbus Defense and Space/38 North(SEOUL) -- North Korea is set to dismantle its nuclear testing facility at Punggye-ri this week in front of a delegation of two dozen handpicked foreign journalists.

The journalists flew on a chartered plane Tuesday from Beijing to the city of Wonsan on the east coast of North Korea and were set to be taken on a long journey to the nuclear site near the village of Punggye-ri.

From Wonsan, the group is expected to travel at least 11 hours on a train up the coast and another four hours into the foothills of Mount Mantap by bus and then finally an hourlong hike to the nuclear test site, according to reporters there.

The research group 38 North said an analysis of satellite imagery taken Monday showed that what was probably an observation platform had nearly been completed at the test site and that improvements had been made to a nearby road and pathway. Another probable observation position had appeared to have been placed on a hillside there, the group said Tuesday.

North Korean state media previously reported the dismantlement process will involve “collapsing all of its tunnels with explosions, blocking its entrances, and removing all observation facilities, research buildings and security posts” and that foreign media was invited to cover the event to show the process in a “transparent manner.”

Journalists from the U.S., China, U.K. and Russia were among the small group invited to witness the process but The Associated Press reported eight South Korean journalists, who were initially invited, were refused visas after they arrived in Beijing to connect onward to North Korea. The decision coincided with latest protests from Pyongyang over the U.S.-South Korea military drills. No experts were among those invited.

South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in’s government expressed regret over the decision to exclude their journalists just as Moon prepared to meet with President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., Tuesday to discuss Trump’s planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore. The meeting was scheduled for June 12, but Trump said Tuesday "it may not work out for" that day.

Kim announced in April that he no longer needed to conduct nuclear tests because the country had achieved its "nuclear weaponization."

Punggye-ri in the northeast of the country has been the site of every one of the six North Korean underground nuclear test from 2006 until the most recent one on Sept. 3, 2017.

The facility is built into the granite base of Mount Mantap roughly 100 miles from North Korea’s border with China.

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ABC/Randy Holmes(LOS ANGELES) -- BET has tapped Academy Award winning actor Jamie Foxx to host the 2018 BET Awards.

The network announced on Tuesday that Foxx has signed on to host the annual event, which will take place in Los Angeles June 24. This will be Foxx's second time hosting the music event -- his first time was in 2009.

As previously noted, DJ Khaled tops the list of nominees this year with six nominations, including Video of the Year and two for Best Collaboration, with Rihanna and Bryson Tiller, for "Wild Thoughts," and with Jay-Z, Future and Beyoncé for "Top Off."

Kendrick Lamar follows with five nominations, while Migos and SZA have four each.  

The 2018 BET Awards air live Sunday, June 24 at 8 p.m. ET from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

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Scott Clarke / ESPN Images(NEW YORK) -- Serena Williams will not be given a seeding at this year's French Open, her first major tournament since taking maternity leave.

The 36-year-old gave birth to her daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr., in September 2017.

She was ranked number one when she took leave from the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tour last year, and had dropped to rank 453 during her absence.

Without a seeding, the 23-time Grand Slam winner could face highly-ranked opponents in the early round of a tournament she has won three times.

“This year, again, tournament officials will establish the list and ranking of the women’s seeds based on the WTA ranking,” the French Tennis Federation said in a statement to ABC News. “Consequently, the seeds will reflect this week’s world ranking.”

A spokesperson for the French Tennis Federation would not comment on the criticism they have received following the announcement.

In Paris, Williams will compete at her first Grand Slam since winning the 2017 Australian Open while pregnant with Alexis, her daughter with husband Alexis Ohanian.

The American champion returned to the WTA tour in March this year, and compiled two wins and two losses.

Williams spoke to "GMA" anchor Robin Roberts last month about the health hardships she's endured after sustaining a pulmonary embolism the day after her emergency cesarean section.

"Then everything was fine for the first, like, you know, eight to 12 hours," she said. "Then it was after that things started going crazy."

Williams said at the time she was still in the process of fully recovering from the medical ordeal, adding that "it hasn't been easy for me."

Williams' coach said in an interview published May 14, before the seedings were announced, that Williams, who recently attended Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding, has been training very hard.

“She is improving in all the areas fast. I am very satisfied and confident that she will be ready for Roland Garros," Patrick Mouratoglou said in an interview for the WTA's website.

"Serena will play the French Open to win it," he said. "Can she do it? Serena can achieve anything -- after being her coach for six years, I'm even more sure of that statement."

The French Open draw will be made on Thursday. The tournament starts next Sunday.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The mayor of Washington, D.C., is a 45-year-old single woman who has worked her way to the very top of the city’s government, becoming the youngest person and only the second woman to be mayor.

Mayor Muriel Bowser is now also breaking new ground in political office as a single mom with the announcement she has adopted a baby.

“As any new mother would feel — I am thrilled, nervous and looking forward to each and every stage,” Bowser said in a statement Monday. “I will be taking the next week or so to enjoy these precious moments with my new baby. I am so grateful to be able to start my family in this wonderful way.”

Bowser, who has served as mayor since 2015, revealed that she started the adoption process last year.

“I decided to start the adoption journey, just knowing that it was a great time in my life and I had so much to share with a baby," she told WUSA9, adding that the baby came to her sooner than expected.

"What I've learned from Washingtonians all over our city, is that people start their families in many different ways," Bowser said. "And I have been encouraged by many people to make sure that not only do I pour my heart and soul into being mayor and to governing a great city, but also to think about a family."

She did not share details about her plans for childcare once she returns to work.

The average cost of childcare in Washington, D.C., is $1,886 per month, according to the Economic Policy Institute.

Bowser announced in April that she would include $12.5 million in her 2019 budget toward "making early child care more affordable for all District residents" through a refundable tax credit and increased funding to local child care providers.

During Bowser's term as mayor, she has also launched a website, MyChildCareDC.org, that allows parents to search and compare child care options and last year started an initiative to provide more resources for maternal and child health, according to her office.

“It's very, very real and I feel grateful that I have a wonderful family, a wonderful support team to support me in this adoption journey," Bowser told WUSA9.

Bowser is not the first women in public service to welcome a child while in power -- Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., recently did it age the age of 50 -- but she does stand out for doing it on her own.

In the United States, 23 percent of children only live with their mother, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

Bowser said she believes her new role will not take away from her job, but add to it.

"It certainly gives me another point of view," she told WUSA9. "I have, we have, been very focused on families in this administration making sure that we do everything for schools and child care and great play spaces and safe neighborhoods."

Bowser received quick congratulations on Twitter from a fellow D.C. legislator who also broke new ground as a mom.

“Zoe can’t wait to meet her new friend,” wrote Council member Brianne Nadeau (D-Ward 1).

Nadeau gave birth to her daughter, Zoe, while in office last year and, in December, pumped during a public hearing on housing.

After Duckworth, an Iraq veteran and double leg amputee, gave birth to her daughter in April, the U.S. Senate passed a rule change that will allow her, and any woman of the Senate, to bring babies onto the floor and breastfeed them as needed.

In the statehouse in Iowa, Rep. Megan Jones made headlines this year when she returned to work in the State Capitol a mere 13 days after giving birth to her daughter, Alma.

Bowser's adoption announcement and the progress made by politicians who are also moms comes amid a so-called "pink wave" of women running for office across the U.S.

Some of those female candidates have included themselves breastfeeding in their campaign ads — a move they say underscores the dynamic role of mothers in the political sphere.

“It was no accident. It’s my life. It’s the reality of working moms — taking care of family, juggling work and getting the job done,” Krish Vignarajah, a Maryland gubernatorial candidate, told ABC News. “I hope the ad drives a conversation about the lack of representation in elected office in Maryland and the policy consequences of that lack of diversity.”

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