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ABCNews.com(SAN ANTONIO) -- Eight people were found dead and about 30 others injured inside a brutally hot semitrailer parked in a Walmart parking lot in San Antonio, Texas, in what authorities are calling "a horrific scene."

One of the injured later died, officials said, bringing the death toll to 10 in what police described as an apparent "human trafficking crime."

Authorities became aware of the truck overnight after a Walmart employee, who had been approached by someone who had been in the truck asking for water, notified police of the interaction, San Antonio Police Chief William McManus said Sunday morning at a press conference, alongside other officials from the city.

Inside the semitrailer, authorities found eight dead bodies, as well as 20 other people who were in "extremely critical condition or very serious condition," and eight others suffering lesser injuries like heat stroke and dehydration, San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood told the press Sunday morning.

There were 38 people inside the truck in total, McManus said, and Hood added that at least two of them were "school-age" children.

The truck had no working air-conditioning system, and temperatures topped 100 degrees Fahrenheit, Hood said. McManus added that the truck's pass lacked access to water.

"They were very hot to the touch," Hood said of the people found inside.

The driver of the truck was arrested and could face federal and state charges, according to police. The driver's name was not given at Sunday morning's press conference.

"We're looking at a human-trafficking crime here," McManus said.

Meanwhile, surveillance video from the store showed that a number of vehicles entered the parking lot and "picked up lots of folks that were in that trailer that survived the trip," McManus said.

Some of the people who had been in the truck also ran into the woods, he said. The area was searched, and another attempt will be made in the morning, the officials said.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Immigration and Customs Enforcement has also been called in to help investigate the incident, officials said.

San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood, who stood alongside McManus at the press conference, said firefighters arrived on the scene at 12:26 a.m. local time, and began pulling the people out of the truck. The injured were taken to different hospitals, some by helicopter, he said.

Authorities said they still don't know the origin of the truck, or how long it had been parked at the Walmart, and that the search for such details are part of an active investigation currently underway.

The officials said more details about the victims, including their genders and ages, would be released in a future briefing.

While he called it a "horrific tragedy," the police chief said the discovery "is not an isolated incident. This happens quite frequently ... fortunately there are people who survived, but this happens all the time,” he said.

Thomas Homan, acting Director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), weighed in on the incident, calling it a "horrific crime."

“By any standard, the horrific crime uncovered last night ranks as a stark reminder of why human smuggling networks must be pursued, caught and punished," Homan said in a statement. "These networks have repeatedly shown a reckless disregard for those they smuggle."

U.S. Attorney Richard L. Durbin Jr. of the Western District of Texas described what emergency workers found as "a horrific scene."

"All were victims of ruthless human smugglers indifferent to the well-being of their fragile cargo," Durbin said. "The South Texas heat is punishing this time of year. These people were helpless in the hands of their transporters. Imagine their suffering, trapped in a stifling trailer in 100-plus degree heat."


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ABCNews.com(CARSON CITY, Nev.) -- The countdown is on for O.J. Simpson's release from Nevada's Lovelock Correctional Center, which could come as early as Oct. 1.

So how is the former football star's state of mind?

"Mr. Simpson is on cloud nine," his lawyer, Malcolm LaVergne, told Fox News' Jeanine Pirro during an interview Saturday night. "He obviously likes the outcome ... Everything is hung from the moon at this point."

A group of four commissioners from the Nevada parole board on Thursday granted parole to Simpson after he served the minimum nine years of his 33-year sentence for a 2007 kidnapping and armed robbery incident in Las Vegas. Simpson was sentenced to prison after he allegedly led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal sports memorabilia at gunpoint; he contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him, and he denied ever holding a gun or threatening the robbery victims.

Following the parole board's decision, Simpson is now in protective custody, having been moved to a separate part of the prison and removed from the general population, according to Nevada Department of Corrections spokesperson Brooke Keast.

But that's not sitting well with Simpson, according to LaVergne.

"The only thing that's kind of a little bit disheartening for him is that he's had a change of custody status, and they are going to kind of change that for the next couple of months until he's released," LaVergne said. "He's had to move his cell to an area where he is a bit more protected. There's good reason for that. One of them is for his own safety and basically not to rile things up ... There is a legitimate concern about threats."

As for his post-prison life, LaVergne said, "Florida has obviously been mentioned. California is another option. He is looking forward to spending a lot of time with his family. There were loved ones who have passed away, who he wants to honor them at their graves. He wants to live a quiet life."

And contrary to reports and Internet speculation, LaVergne said Simpson is not currently negotiating any deals, such as starring in a reality show.

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Janet Weinstein/ABC News (NORFOLK, Va.) -- President Trump at the commissioning of the Navy's first new aircraft carrier in 40 years declared that the massive ship ensures that "if a fight does come ... we will win."

The president made his remarks aboard the USS Gerald R. Ford, which was unveiled at a commissioning ceremony on Saturday in Norfolk, Virginia.

The massive ship -- which displaces 100,000 tons of water and is about twice as long as the Washington Monument would be on its side -- cost nearly $13 billion to build, making it the Navy's most expensive aircraft carrier ever.

Navy officials say the ship is state-of-the-art, from its voyage-management system to the design of its sleeping quarters for sailors.

The president said the aircraft carrier sends a message to the world that “American might is second to none.”

"This ship also ensures that if a fight does come, it will always end the same way," Trump said. "We will win, win, win. We will never lose."

The president also touted securing $20 billion dollars for the defense budget and took a subtle swipe at previous administrations for what he said was unpredictable military funding.

"For years our government has subjected the military to unpredictable funding ... This has led to deferred maintenance, a lack of investment in new equipment and technology."

Navy officials said the USS Gerald R. Ford is the first of a class that will replace Nimitz-class carriers as the next generation of ships.

“This is the first new design of an aircraft carrier in more than 40 years, and it really is a state-of-the-art ship,” U.S. Navy Cmdr. Dave Hecht told ABC News. "The USS Gerald R. Ford is really a quantum leap into the 21st century."

ABC News and other media were invited on a tour of the carrier 12 days before its commissioning on Saturday. Officers brought the press around for a quick look at the flight deck, crew quarters, navigation room, and other spaces that represent advancements from earlier classes of carriers.

“Our voyage-management system is the only one of its kind. Our steering gear-control system, only one of its kind,” Petty Officer 1st Class Jose Triana said. “You really can’t compare it to anything else.'

On the flight deck, planes will use a new electromagnetic system to launch as opposed to the old steam-driven catapult.

The redesign extends to the sleeping areas. Before, 100 sailors would be crammed together at night. Now, only 25 to 30 will sleep in each area.

The massive 1,100-foot warship won’t be sent into combat for at least four more years, as it still needs to undergo more testing. Around 2,600 sailors will work and call the ship home once it’s fully operational.

Despite the delays and big price tag, the U.S. Navy says the Ford-class carriers will be $4 billion cheaper to construct compared to older ships.

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iStock/Thinkstock(COCOA, Fla.) -- Police in Florida are pursuing misdemeanor charges against five teenagers for failure to report a death after authorities say they recorded video of a man’s drowning and didn't intervene.

The video, taken earlier this month in Cocoa, Florida, about 45 miles east of Orlando, shows a person's head bobbing up and down in a pond. The teenagers, who are between the ages of 14 and 18 and have not been named by police, are heard laughing and joking in the video, with one of them appearing to laugh and say, "He just died!"

Cocoa Police Chief Mike Cantaloupe said the department learned of the recording last weekend and later reviewed it. Police identified and interviewed the five teens, he said.

Police in conjunction with the State Attorney’s Office determined that charges of "failure to report a death under Florida Statute 406.12," a misdemeanor, will be pursued, the Cocoa police said in a statement Friday. Police said the charging document, case report and video evidence are being sent to the State Attorney’s Office for review, and a decision about whether the charges will be prosecuted.

“When we initially reviewed this case it was determined there were no laws broken as the teens were not directly involved with the death,” Cantaloupe said in a statement Friday. "Further research of the statutes and consultation with the State Attorney’s Office yielded the decision to move forward with charges under this statute. It’s our belief that this law has never been enforced in a scenario like this, but we feel it could be applicable.”

Cantaloupe added, “Pursuing criminal charges is a way to hold them accountable for their own actions.”

Earlier, Cocoa police said that the five teenagers were not facing criminal charges after the State Attorney’s Office was consulted.

“As horrible as this video is the laws in the State of Florida do not obligate citizens to render aid or call someone to render aid to a person in distress," Cantaloupe said on Thursday.

The victim, 31-year-old Jamel Dunn of Cocoa, drowned July 9, police said. He was reported missing July 12 and authorities recovered his body July 14 after a passerby reported a body floating in the pond.

Police said home surveillance video apparently captured Dunn jumping over a fence and willingly going into the water. "I don't think you can ever replace a lost life," Cantaloupe told ABC News Friday.

He added, "I think what we look at is, the hope that what we do from here going forward, whether it be this charge or some new legislation, that another family doesn’t have to go through this. And that we work with our youth ... to instill these morals ... I would’ve never believed that somebody could watch somebody in distress and not do anything about it."

Of the video recorded by the teenagers, Cantaloupe said in a statement Thursday, "There are no words to describe how utterly inhumane and cruel the actions of these juveniles were towards Mr. Dunn. ... I want to express my deepest condolences to Mr. Dunn’s family and friends."

Cocoa Mayor Henry Parrish III released a statement Friday regarding the incident. "It saddens me to the core to watch video shot by a group of kids watching a man drown and doing nothing to help him. There just are no words to describe the lack of conscience within these young people," he said.

"I also would like to extend my deepest condolences to Mr. Dunn’s family and friends," he added. "My hope is we all come together to make sure this doesn’t happen to anyone else."

Parrish said of the decision to pursue charges, "While this in no way will bring justice for what occurred, it is a start."

"In a case like this we struggle to understand how anyone could be so cold and heartless and then learn that there are no laws in Florida that obligate someone to render aid or call for someone to render aid for a person they see in distress," he said. "If this case can be used as an example to draft new legislation, then I am committed to move forward to make that happen. More so, may this tragic incident, which has shocked all of us, cause each of us to examine ourselves and our responsibility to one another."

"I implore the State Attorney’s Office to follow through and file the charges presented by the Cocoa Police Department!" he added.

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iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) -- A sheriff's deputy in Texas was fired Friday for her alleged involvement in a deadly fight outside a Houston-area Denny's restaurant in May.

The Harris County Sheriff's Office announced in a press release Friday that it has concluded its internal investigation of the violent altercation in a parking lot of a Denny's restaurant on May 28 that left 24-year-old John Hernandez dead. As a result, Deputy Chauna Thompson, who faces charges in the man's death, has been terminated.

“I have strong confidence in the leadership of the Harris County Sheriff’s Office, as well as the rank-and-file deputies who put their lives on the line every day to protect our community,” Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said in a statement Friday afternoon. “However, we will learn from the tragic death of John Hernandez."

Four other unnamed employees -- three sergeants and one deputy -- received disciplinary action for their involvement in the investigation, the sheriff's office said.

"It was great news to us. We feel like it should have happened since day one, but it's a step in the right direction and we're pleased with the outcome," Melissa Hernandez, a cousin of the victim, told ABC station KTRK-TV in Houston.

Chauna Thompson's attorney, Greg Cagle, told KTRK-TV she was fired for "inaction."

"They called her in, wouldn't tell her what the meeting was about, and told her she was fired," Cagle said.

Chauna Thompson had been put on administrative leave without pay on June 6.

A Harris County grand jury on June 8 indicted the deputy and her husband, Terry Thompson, on murder charges in the choking death of Hernandez, whom the couple encountered outside the Denny's restaurant near Sheldon, about 17 miles from downtown Houston. Chauna Thompson was off-duty at the time, the sheriff's office said.

According to the initial incident report, the confrontation occurred on May 28 around 11:40 p.m. after Terry Thompson pulled into the Denny's parking lot with his children where he saw Hernandez urinating outside the restaurant. Terry Thompson approached the man, which led to the physical altercation.

Chauna Thompson arrived in a separate car to join her family at the restaurant and called authorities for assistance. The off-duty deputy then helped her husband restrain Hernandez, and they then realized the man had stopped breathing. Chauna Thompson "immediately" performed CPR on him until medics arrived and transported him to a local hospital, according to the incident report.

Hernandez later died by asphyxiation, the sheriff's office said.

Chauna Thompson’s attorney said she and her husband had no intention of causing harm and as soon as the then-deputy saw Hernandez needed help, she rendered aid.

"She was there for under a minute and at the very moment she realized he was having a medical issue, she told her husband to get off and then she performed CPR," Cagle told KTRK-TV.

According to KTRK-TV, cellphone video of the incident taken by a witness shows Chauna Thompson yelling at Hernandez to stay on the ground, cursing at him and pushing her right knee into his side. The footage also shows her husband on top of Hernandez with his arm around the man's throat.

Scot Courtney, the attorney for Terry Thompson, said the cellphone video does not show everything that occurred.

"They certainly don't show the beginning where Mr. Hernandez attacked my client. He was the initial aggressor," Courtney said in a June 5 statement, according to KTRK-TV.

The Harris County sheriff said the internal investigation found "no evidence of nefarious actions on the part of our on-duty personnel" who responded to the incident.

"We did find areas in which we must improve as a department," Gonzalez added in his statement Friday. "I will continue reviewing best practices to implement changes aimed at improving scene management and other aspects of our operation."

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.) -- Minnesota officials have identified and located a key witness to the officer-involved shooting that killed an Australian bride-to-be in Minneapolis.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety Bureau of Criminal Apprehension announced in a press release Friday night that its agents interviewed the witness, who was seen riding a bike in the area immediately before the shooting and stopped at the scene to watch as two Minneapolis police officers provided medical assistance to Justine Ruszczyk.

"The individual has been cooperative and provided an interview today," the agency said in the Friday-night press release, without naming the individual.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, which is conducting the investigation into the incident at the request of the Minneapolis Police Department, is urging anyone who may have also witnessed the shooting to contact them at 651-793-7000.

Ruszczyk, a 40-year-old Australian native, called 911 on the night of July 15 to report what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood. Two officers from the Minneapolis Police Department, identified by authorities as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor, responded to Ruszczyk's call.

Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. As they neared Ruszczyk's home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver's side, authorities said.

Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver's side window, which was open. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until medics arrived, but she was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office has confirmed that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen.

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave pending the investigation. Ruszczyk's death has been ruled a homicide.

The Minneapolis Police Department has launched an internal affairs review of the officers' use of force.

Harrity's attorney, Fred Bruno, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that it was "certainly reasonable" for the police officers to assume they could be the target of an ambush.

Noor has not provided any statements regarding the incident and has declined to be interviewed by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, the agency said. Noor's attorney has not provided an update on when, if ever, an interview would be possible. The agency said it cannot by law compel the officer to give a testimony.

On Friday, the city's police chief, Janeé Harteau, resigned after Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said she “lost confidence in the chief’s ability to lead.” Hodges also announced she has nominated Assistant Chief Medaria "Rondo" Arradondo to lead the police department.

Ruszczyk, who went by her fiancé's last name, Damond, was a yoga instructor, a personal health and life coach, and a "meditation teacher, embracing and teaching the neuro-scientific benefits of meditation," according to her personal website.

Ruszczyk's family -- most of whom are located in her native country of Australia -- said they have been in close touch with U.S. and Australian officials in reference to the ongoing investigation of her death.

"We are in constant contact with the Australian government and representatives of the U.S. government and Minnesota state authorities," the family said in a statement Thursday. "We want to see the investigation come to a conclusion as soon as possible, so we have some resolution to the tragedy."

Robert Bennett, the attorney representing both Ruszczyk's fiancé and her family, told ABC News on Friday that they want "justice in its largest sense."

"I think Justine is the last person you’d expect to be killed by police," said Bennett, who represented the family of Philando Castile, a black man who was fatally shot by Minnesota police in July 2016.

"Of the cases that I’ve been involved in over the years, she doesn’t fit any of the patterns," Bennett added. "Her life’s intersection with the police is totally bizarre."

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Chaos erupted at a Minneapolis press conference Friday night as the city’s mayor nominated a new police chief amid citywide anger in the wake of the officer-involved shooting of an Australian bride-to-be.

Minneapolis residents and demonstrators attended the news conference, and one man began shouting down Mayor Betsy Hodges, yelling, “We do not want you as mayor,” to applause from those gathered. As Hodges left the room, the demonstrators chanted “Bye-bye, Betsy!”

About an hour later, Hodges returned to speak to the gathered press and take questions. The mayor had asked for Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau's resignation after she “lost confidence in the chief’s ability to lead.” She announced that she has nominated Assistant Chief Medaria "Rondo" Arradondo to lead the department.

Earlier Friday night, Harteau had announced that she is resigning in the wake of the deadly shooting last weekend.

"[L]ast Saturday’s tragedy, as well as some other recent incidents, have caused me to engage in deep reflection," Harteau said in part in a statement posted on the police department's Facebook page.

She continued: "The recent incidents do not reflect the training and procedures we’ve developed as a Department. Despite the MPD’s many accomplishments under my leadership over these years and my love for the City, I have to put the communities we serve first. I’ve decided I am willing to step aside to let a fresh set of leadership eyes see what more can be done for the MPD to be the very best it can be."

Justine Ruszczyk, 40, who went by her fiancé Don Damond's last name, was killed by a police officer on July 15 after she called 911 to report what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home.

Authorities said officers Matthew Harrity and Mohammed Noor responded to Ruszczyk's 911 call, but never found a suspect. They were startled by a loud noise and then Ruszczyk approached the driver's side of the car and Noor, who was on the passenger side, fired his gun through the open driver's side window, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Harrity's attorney, Fred Bruno, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that it was "certainly reasonable" for the police officers to assume they could be the target of an ambush.

Noor has not made any statements to investigators and has declined to be interviewed, according to Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave pending the investigation. Ruszczyk's death has been ruled a homicide.

Police have launched an internal affairs review of the officers' use of force.

Harteau faced criticism for her notable absence in the days following Ruszczyk's death, but she told reporters Thursday that she was in a remote area, "backpacking in the mountains," which made it difficult for her to return. She was scheduled to return on Aug. 1, she said.

Hodges said in a statement that she asked for Harteau's resignation.

"I've lost confidence in the chief’s ability to lead us further — and from the many conversations I've had with people around our city, especially this week, it is clear that she has lost the confidence of the people of Minneapolis as well," Hodges said. “In conversation with the chief today, she and I agreed that she would step aside to make way for new leadership. I asked Chief Harteau for her resignation, she tendered it, and I have accepted it.”

On Wednesday, the Minneapolis Police Department released transcripts from Ruszczyk’s Saturday’s 911 call, detailing what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood.

"I can hear someone out the back and I -- I'm not sure if she's having sex or being raped," Ruszczyk tells the 911 operator, according to the transcript released by police.

Robert Bennett, the attorney representing both Damond and family of Ruszczyk, told ABC News this week "the family wants justice in its largest sense."

"I think Justine is the last person you’d expect to be killed by police," Bennett said.

Bennett said the idea that Justine Damond could have been thought of as a threat is "patently, utterly, ridiculous."

"If that’s the excuse they want to use to shoot people, I guess they can use any excuse they want, we’re all in danger," the attorney said.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension said Friday that a witness to the shooting has been identified and interviewed, though the agency did not disclose what the witness, a bicyclist, said.

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EJ Hersom/Department of Defense(WASHINGTON) -- Hundreds of service members lined the halls of the Pentagon on Friday to welcome three of the five remaining survivors from the USS Arizona, 75 years after their ship was attacked by the Japanese in Pearl Harbor.

Lauren Bruner (Fire Controlman), Donald Stratton (Seaman First Class), and Ken Potts (Coxswain) traveled to Washington, D.C. to posthumously honor a fellow sailor who saved their lives -- and those of four others -- that fateful day.

During the attack, Bruner and Stratton, trapped on the burning Arizona, caught the attention of a man named Joe George, who was on a neighboring Navy vessel. George helped secure a line to the Arizona, which the men climbed some 70 or 80 feet to safety, 95-year-old Stratton said.

"And we finally got all six of us over there, and Joe George coaxing us saying, 'Come on sailor, you can make it, you can make it,'" Stratton told ABC News.

Potts, uninjured in the attack, assisted in the recovery of his shipmate's bodies. Over 1,000 Americans died on the USS Arizona on December 7, 1941.

After the grand welcome to the Pentagon, the men and their wives met with Defense Secretary James Mattis, followed by a lunch with the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, Steven Giordano, as well as enlisted sailors.

They then headed to the White House to visit with President Trump, who delivered remarks in the Oval Office.

“For these three World War II veterans, Dec. 7, 1941, the brutal attack on Pearl Harbor, is forever seared into their memories," Trump said. "It's also seared into America's memory, because on that grim day this mighty nation was roused to defend freedom itself."

"There are many remarkable things that I witness as president, but nothing can take the place of meeting heroes like those with us today," he added. "In them we see the strength of our nation, the courage of our men and women in uniform, the resolve to never accept failure, and the belief that justice will always triumph."

Stratton told Trump that the country was "coming together again."

"All the people we met today, and all the people that were lined along as we went along, you can tell with the military and everything that this country's coming together again, and we're going to be there," he said.

USS Arizona survivor Donald Stratton's emotional comments during WH visit: "This country's coming together again" https://t.co/HCWaCN5oK1 pic.twitter.com/EGpcWDFeTS

— ABC News (@ABC) July 21, 2017

Mattis told reporters later that the sailors are a reminder of those who have endured so much during their time in military service.

"It's a reminder why you need physical fitness standards in the military," Mattis added. "Only way they saved themselves going from one ship to another."

Stratton and Bruner, while severely injured during the Pearl Harbor attack, later returned to military service and deployed to the Pacific to fight in World War II.

"So we started the war and we finished it," Stratton said.

For these men, the visit to the nation's capital was an important way to finally honor George.

"We're not heroes, we just got lucky and with the help of God and the good Lord we're here today," Stratton said.

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ABC News(NORWALK, Conn.) -- Nury Chavarria, an undocumented mother of four who has lived in the United States for 24 years, was set to be deported to Guatemala on Thursday night. Instead, Chavarria refused to leave her children, taking sanctuary in a Connecticut church.

Chavarria left Guatemala and came to the United States without legal papers in 1993 when she was 19, ABC affiliate WTNH-TV reported.

She ultimately settled in Norwalk, Connecticut, where she got a job as a housekeeper and raised a family. Chavarria, now 43, has four children who are all U.S. citizens, two of whom are in college. She has no criminal history and has paid taxes since she received a work permit, according to her immigration attorneys.

Chavarria told WTNH-TV that she has been honest about her immigration status for years and regularly and voluntarily checked in with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. But this year, ICE fitted her with a GPS ankle monitor to track her movements ahead of her deportation, she said.

Chavarria was supposed to board the plane that would take her out of the country at 5 p.m. on Thursday. She sought sanctuary in the Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church in New Haven, according to Sidd Sinha, one of the lawyers who represented Chavarria in her battle against the deportation order.

"On behalf of Formica Williams, P.C., we have been informed that Nury Chavarria has opted to seek refuge in a local church through sanctuary," Sinha said in a statement provided to ABC News on Friday.

Sinha said the law firm will continue to represent Chavarria in her petition to stay and for any applications on relief that may become available, but that she is retaining new counsel regarding her decision to enter sanctuary.

An ICE spokesperson told ABC News that Chavarria is "currently an ICE fugitive" because she did not obey orders to leave the country.

"Nury Chavarria was allowed to voluntarily depart by a federal immigration judge in 1998, and failed to comply, rendering her subject to final order of removal in 1999," the spokesperson said in a statement Friday. "In 2010, the agency deferred her removal for one year on humanitarian grounds. As a current exercise of discretion and after an exhaustive review of her case, the agency had allowed her to remain free from custody while finalizing her timely departure plans."

"Since she did not depart as instructed, she is currently an ICE fugitive," the spokesperson added.

ICE agents are asked to avoid conducting enforcement activities at "sensitive locations unless they have prior approval from an appropriate supervisory official or in the event of exigent circumstances," the spokesperson said. These locations include schools, hospitals and places of worship.

Meeting with Nury Chavarria at Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal church in #NewHaven pic.twitter.com/8Yy1XnrTiF

— Governor Dan Malloy (@GovMalloyOffice) July 20, 2017

Gov. Dan Malloy (D-Conn.) said on Twitter that he had met with Chavarria at the church and posted photos of them together Thursday. The governor did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Friday.

Iglesia De Dios Pentecostal Church also did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Friday.

Kica Matos, director of immigrant rights and racial justice at the Center for Community Change, headquartered in Washington, D.C., is among the local activists and members of the community working to help protect Chavarria and her family. Matos told ABC News on Friday that Chavarria remains at the church and "has settled in" with the youngest of her four children, Hayley.

The 9-year-old girl spoke to reporters at the church and made a direct plea to President Donald Trump to allow her mother to stay.

“She’s not a criminal. She has a positive attitude about everything. I want her to stay because I love her so much. My message to President Trump is: don’t separate my family,” Hayley Chavarria said, according to WTNH-TV.

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Stephen Dunn/Hartford Courant/MCT via Getty Images(CHESHIRE, Conn.) -- This weekend marks 10 years since a horrific crime shocked a suburban Connecticut town. In the middle of the night on July 23, 2007, two men broke into a house in Cheshire, killing Jennifer Hawke-Petit and her two daughters and setting the house on fire. Only the victims' husband and father, Dr. William Petit Jr., escaped alive.

That July day was "the single worst day I've ever had in 40 years of municipal government," Michael Malone, who was Cheshire town manager then and still is today, told ABC News Thursday. "I can still vividly remember that day. It was horrible. It was surreal. I felt like I was sleepwalking."

Tragedy in Cheshire

The tragedy in Cheshire began when one of the killers targeted Hawke-Petit, 48, who had multiple sclerosis, and her youngest daughter, 11-year-old Michaela, at the grocery store. He followed the pair home unbeknownst to them and later returned to the house at night with a second man to break in, according to testimony.

Dr. Petit was asleep in the sun room when the attackers smashed his head with a baseball bat and then tied him up in the basement.

The attackers next bound Michaela and her 17-year-old sister, Hayley, to their beds, and in the morning, one of the intruders drove Hawke-Petit to a bank to withdraw money.

Hawke-Petit and the intruder then returned to the home, where the mother and her 11-year-old daughter were sexually assaulted. Hawke-Petit was strangled to death, according to testimony. Hayley and Michaela died of smoke inhalation, according to testimony.

Petit, still bound in the basement, managed to free his hands, and hop up the stairs and out the front door, according to testimony.

"My heart felt like it was beating 200 beats per minute," he later testified at Hayes' 2011 trial, "like it was going to explode out of my chest."

Somehow, he said, he crawled, then rolled to a neighbor's house. Doctors said later Petit had lost as much as seven pints of blood. He said his neighbor didn't even recognize him at first because he was so bloody.

Police surrounded the area, but Komisarjevsky and Hayes were still able to flee the scene. The men were caught on the street.

In the aftermath, authorities faced criticism for not rushing into the house during the ordeal, but "police did what they were trained to do," Malone told ABC News Thursday. A police captain said at trial that standard procedure was followed.

"Still to this day some people blame us, blame the police," he said, "and they do it in a very hateful way ... with profanity-laced hate email."

A town recovered and giving back

Now, 10 years later, the town of Cheshire has "really fully recovered and put this behind them," Malone said. "But [the town] has never forgotten it because as a result of this tragedy, a couple of pretty significant charitable organizations have sprung up."

One of those organizations is Cheshire’s Lights of Hope, started by Cheshire resident Jenifer Walsh and her husband. Walsh told ABC News earlier this week that after the tragedy "people in the town were so devastated by it and everybody wanted to help," so she and her husband hoped to bring the town together.

Walsh said the purpose of Cheshire’s Lights of Hope, which hosts an annual event that places luminaries on each street in town, is to bring people together so neighbors know each other.

"The neighbors of the Petits didn't know this was going in the middle of the night on their street," she said. "Half the time everyone is so busy in their own little world ... you just wave to your neighbors, you don't even know your neighbors."

Each of the town's streets participates in the event every year, lining the roads with lights, Walsh said.

Malone said the sight of the luminaries is "incredible" and called them a "reminder of hope and the message that Dr. Petit had presented when we had a memorial service for his family."

According to the Hartford Courant, Petit said at an emotional memorial days after the killings, "Help a neighbor. Fight for a cause. ... Love your family."

Malone said Cheshire’s Lights of Hope truly has fought for a cause as Petit wanted by providing "financial support for so many nonprofits in this town, many in the name of the Petits."

The first year after the tragedy, Cheshire’s Lights of Hope raised money to help the Petit family, but the organization has since become a nonprofit, turning its focus away from the crime and toward the needs of the town, Walsh said. The organization donates to town needs including social services, the food pantry and scholarships, Walsh said, with some money still going to the Petit family.

"Some people think we do it every year because it's for the Petits ... but it's not really about that anymore," Walsh said. "It's focusing back on the whole town, which is what Dr. Petit wanted."

A survivor moves forward


Komisarjevsky and Hayes were convicted in the killings and are serving life in prison. Outside the courthouse after Hayes' guilty verdict in 2011, Petit said of his decision to attend court throughout the trial, "if your family was destroyed by evil I think that you would all try to do the same thing and be there for your family. It's the one thing that you can do."

"There is some relief," Petit said of the guilty verdict, "but my family is still gone. It doesn't bring them back. It doesn't bring back the home that we had."

"We did our best to keep our faith in God that justice would be served," he added.

After the tragedy Dr. Petit re-married, and he now has a son with his wife, Christine Petit, whom he met while she was volunteering for his charity, the Petit Family Foundation. The organization aims to "raise and distribute funds to fulfill our mission to help educate young people especially those with interests in science, to help support those with chronic illnesses, and to help protect those affected by violence," according to its website.

Last year, Dr. Petit was elected to the Connecticut House of Representatives. The Petits declined to comment for this report.

Malone said Dr. Petit has "been an inspiration to the community. And so I think that, combined with the Lights of Hope and also The Petit [Family] Foundation, [are ways for] people to remember, to move on also in their own way, to try to help some organizations that Dr. Petit feels is in keeping with the spirit that he tried to create when he gave his speech."

Malone said these organizations "really helped the people of the community move behind this. It certainly created a tighter community. And it's also a reminder to people just how horrible this senseless tragedy was and what he had to go through and what his family went through. Because sometimes we all get caught up in how it affected us and it's important to stop and remember that they are the ones that suffered the loss and the tragedy. And we have to remember them."

Malone said, "While the town has moved on, every year we do take time out," either around the July anniversary or the holidays, as "a way to remind the community of this really sad event and to remind everyone of the sense of hope that Dr. Petit inspired in everyone when he spoke at the memorial service."

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ABC News(LOVELOCK, Nev.) -- O.J. Simpson is now in protective custody at Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada, having been moved to a separate part of the prison and removed from the general population, according to Nevada Department of Corrections spokesperson Brooke Keast.

Keast confirmed to ABC News Friday that the 70-year-old former football star has been moved as a precautionary measure for his safety due to Simpson's notoriety and the attention given to his parole hearing Thursday.

A group of four commissioners on the Nevada parole board granted parole to Simpson after he served the minimum nine years of his 33-year sentence for a 2007 kidnapping and armed robbery incident in Las Vegas. Simpson, who expressed both defiance and gratitude at the hearing, could be released as early as Oct. 1.

Bruce Fromong, a victim in the robbery case who spoke in Simpson’s favor at Thursday's parole hearing, told ABC News' Good Morning America in an exclusive interview Friday that he believes Simpson "has served his time" and deserves parole.

"O.J. has served his time," Fromong told GMA. "I had told the [district attorney] at the time I had felt like one to three years was a proper sentence for it."

"It wasn't O.J. who put the gun to my head," Fromong added. "He was also the one who said, 'Put the gun down, put the gun down.'".

Before the parole board Thursday, Fromong admitted that the Las Vegas hotel room that was the site of the botched robbery attempt did contain items that belonged to Simpson, but said that on the day of the robbery, "Simpson was misguided."

Fromong called Simpson his "friend."

Simpson was sentenced to prison after he allegedly led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal sports memorabilia at gunpoint. He contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him, and he denied ever holding a gun or threatening the robbery victims.

The Nevada parole board commissioners gave the following reasons Thursday for granting parole: Simpson has minimal to no prior convictions; he has stable release plans; he has community and/or family support; he has a positive institutional record; he participated in programs specific to addressing behavior that led to incarceration; and his victim is in support of his parole.

Simpson, who appeared remotely at the hearing via video conference from Lovelock Correctional Facility, delivered a rambling account of the incident to the board Thursday, maintaining that he didn’t intend to steal anything that night and that he “wish[es] this would have never happened.”

"I haven't made any excuses in the nine years that I've been here and I'm not trying to make an excuse now," Simpson told the board.

In an interview on GMA Friday, Dr. Henry Johnson said Simpson, his longtime friend whom he visited in prison, is a "very strong man" and was "unjustly found guilty."

Upon his release, Simpson is requesting to live in Florida, where he has family to serve as his support system, officials said Thursday.

Officials said Friday that while Simpson would report to a Florida probation officer, Nevada is still the authority in his case -- so if he violated his parole, he would have to answer to Nevada officials.

More than 20 years ago, Simpson went on trial for the killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ron Goldman. The two were stabbed to death on June 12, 1994, at her Los Angeles home.

On Oct. 3, 1995, at the end of a televised trial that captivated the country, Simpson was acquitted of all criminal charges. He has always maintained his innocence.

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STEPHEN MATUREN/AFP/Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The attorney representing both the fiancé and family of the Australian bride-to-be who was fatally shot by a Minneapolis Police Department officer on Saturday says "the family wants justice in its largest sense."

Justine Ruszczyk, 40, who went by her fiancé's last name, Damond, was killed by a police officer on July 15 after she called 911 to report what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home.

"I think Justine is the last person you’d expect to be killed by police," Robert Bennett, the attorney representing Justine Damond's family and fiancé, Don Damond, told ABC News.

"Of the cases that I’ve been involved in over the years she doesn’t fit any of the patterns," Bennett, who represented the family of Philando Castile, a black man who was fatally shot by Minnesota police in July 2016, said. "Her life’s intersection with the police is totally bizarre."

Authorities said officers Matthew Harrity and Mohammed Noor responded to Justine Damond's 911 call, but never found a suspect. They were startled by a loud noise and then Justine Damond approached the driver's side of the car and Noor, who was on the passenger side, fired his gun through the open driver's side window, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Harrity's attorney, Fred Bruno, told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that it was "certainly reasonable" for the police officers to assume they could be the target of an ambush.

Bennett said that the idea that Justine Damond could have been thought of as a threat is "patently, utterly, ridiculous."

"If that’s the excuse they want to use to shoot people, I guess they can use any excuse they want, we’re all in danger," the attorney said.

Bennett also called it "inexplicable" that there was no video or audio from the officer's body cameras, a sentiment echoed by Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges, who told ABC News earlier this week that a "key question" for investigators was why the officer's body cameras were not turned on when Justine Damond was shot and killed.

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau said in a news conference Thursday that Justine Damond "didn't have to die." She added that Mohamed Noor, the officer who shot Justine Damond, has not made any statement to investigators.

Bennett said the "strangest part of the case," was that "someone so good, so peaceful, so pacifistic, gets shot by a police officer in her pajamas, in her ally, in a good neighborhood in south Minneapolis."

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The father and sister of Ron Goldman said they found the decision to grant O.J. Simpson parole "very disappointing."

"It was shocking," Kim Goldman, sister of Ron Goldman, said Friday on ABC News' Good Morning America about a Nevada parole board's granting Simpson parole for a 2007 botched robbery. "I think I expected that [Simpson] was going to come in with a script-- 'I did these crimes, I'm so sorry, I'm remorseful, I know that there was a gun in the room.'"

Kim Goldman and Ron's father, Fred Goldman, spoke to GMA Friday about their reactions to the Thursday hearing and Simpson's comments to the parole board.

"I thought he was going to follow what I thought was going to be a very strategic plan for the day and then he went off-script," Kim Goldman said. "He became exactly who he normally is, and I started to panic a little and obviously like everybody else we watched them unanimously willing to release him and it was very disappointing."

The Goldmans said Thursday on GMA that they do not expect to ever see justice for the 1994 killing of their family member, Ron Goldman.

Simpson is expected to be released as early as Oct. 1.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Hundreds of people gathered Thursday night at the Minneapolis site of Justine Damond's fatal shooting, where they held a vigil before marching to a nearby park to continue their remembrance of the Australian expatriate.

Damond, 40, called 911 on July 15 to report a suspected sexual assault outside her home. Once two officers -- identified as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor -- arrived at the house, she approached the driver's side of the squad car, just after Harrity heard a loud sound near the car, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. Noor, who was sitting in the passenger seat, then fired his weapon through the open driver's side window, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety said.

Damond was pronounced dead at the scene.

A large crowd gathered outside Damond's home, including Valerie Castile, the mother of Philando Castile, an African-American man who was shot and killed by a police officer one year ago, according to ABC affiliate KSTP-TV.

The crowd stood silently and hugged each other, while one speaker said, "We gather here before you in our heartbreak, in our longing for healing."

After congregating at the home Damond shared with her fiance Don Damond, the crowd marched to Beard's Plaissance Park on Lake Harriet. Along the way, marchers stopped traffic at some intersections for several minutes, KSTP reported.

One female march participant told KSTP, "I wanted to participate in a peaceful march against what's not right. I would definitely call a friend or a neighbor before I would call the police now."

While many in the crowd spoke about seeking justice, they tempered their message with that of peace and love.

"She lived a life where she would be right here with us," said Sharon Sebring, Don Damond's mother. "I would be serving no purpose if I spoke on behalf of the family with hate or anger, because our mission is to serve her purpose."

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carlballou/iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Speaking publicly for the first time since the deadly officer-involved shooting, Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau said Thursday the killing of Australian woman Justine Ruszczyk didn’t need to happen.

The 40-year-old "didn't have to die," Harteau said of the July 15 shooting incident.

The Minneapolis Police Department squad cars are adorned with the lines, "To protect with courage" and "To serve with compassion," Harteau said.

"This did not happen," she added Thursday evening. "It goes against who we are as a department, how we train and our expectations for our officers."

Harteau said the incident was the result of the “actions and judgment of one individual and that she believes the body cams should have been activated."

The department had only had the body cameras for eight months, so it was “not second nature” for them, she said.

Harteau faced criticism for her notable absence in the days following Ruszczyk's death, but she told reporters Thursday that she was in a remote area, "backpacking in the mountains," which made it difficult for her to return. She was scheduled to return on Aug. 1, she said.

Harteau said she also spoke to Ruszczyk's fiance, Don Damond, and the two had a "positive conversation" on how to move things forward.

On Wednesday, the Minneapolis Police Department released transcripts from Ruszczyk’s Saturday’s 911 call, detailing what she believed was a sexual assault occurring near her home in Minneapolis' Fulton neighborhood.

"I can hear someone out the back and I -- I'm not sure if she's having sex or being raped," Ruszczyk tells the 911 operator, according to the transcript released by police.

Once two officers -- identified as Matthew Harrity and Mohamed Noor -- arrived at Ruszczyk's home, she approached the driver's side of the squad car, just after Harrity heard a loud sound near the car, according to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

Noor, who was sitting in the passenger seat, then fired his weapon through the open driver's side window, the DPS said. Ruszczyk was pronounced dead at the scene.

Noor has not made any statements to investigators, Harteau said.

“I would prefer Officer Noor speak,” she said.



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